Posts Categorised: Breeding

Chip And Belle Puppies!

Pretty litter of blacks and chocolates with lots of retrieving desire throughout their pedigree.

The father is Justamere Chocolate Chip and the mother is Justamere Liberty Bell.

Most dogs aren’t normal?

I read an interesting article this morning. Are breeders blind? Or are we operating under a misconception? The article concludes that the majority of dogs are not normal.

WHAAAT?

“According to Padgett (1991), most breeders continue to believe that the dogs they own are genetically normal.”

Well, gee, I thought they were.

Padgett also reported that “the average number of defects in most breeds may be fourteen.” Some breeds could have as many as 58 defects.

Well, not MY breed.

When the Exercise Induced Collapse (EIC) test came out, I tested my Labs and was blindsided to learn that one was a carrier.

OMG! My dog is defective! I had no idea that one of my dogs harbored that dreaded disease.

My reaction seems to be typical of many breeders. Not only do we believe most dogs are genetically normal, but that having a dog with a defective gene was so out of the ordinary that it should be kept a secret. If we talk about having a defective gene some people might feel our dogs are “less than average or perhaps abnormal.” So we bury our heads in the sand and hope that it will go away.

If we can change our way of thinking – that most dogs are not genetically normal – then it won’t come as such a surprise to get results showing defective genes. If it’s not such a surprise, then maybe we’ll be more willing to share the results thus making it easier to eradicate that gene.

My dog carries one copy of the EIC gene. Dogs with two copies of the gene may collapse under some circumstances. She was fine, but I had to be careful to only breed her to a male who was clear of the gene.

Whew! That doesn’t sound so bad.

So we test before deciding to breed and choose mates wisely.

To learn more, see:
Breed dilemmas and extinction by Dr. Carmen L. Battaglia in The Labrador Quarterly, Winter 2010-11, discussing Padgett, George, “Genetics I Introduction,” 1991 Beagle Review, Darcroft Publishing, Wilmington, VT, Vol. 1, No. 1, Winter 1991, pg. 14-16.

I Love My Little Puppy

 

I love my little puppy; she makes my house a home.
She is my very sweetest little friend; I never feel alone.
She makes me smile; she makes me laugh; she fills my heart with love.
Did someone breed her, or did she fall from above?

I’ve never been a breeder, never seen life through their eyes;
I hold my little puppy and just sit and criticize.
I’ve never known their anguish; I’ve never felt their pain,
The caring of their charges, through snow or wind or rain.

I’ve never waited the whole night through for babies to be born,
The stress and trepidation when they’re still not there by morn.
The weight of responsibility for this body in my hands,
This darling little baby, who weighs but 60 grams.

Should you do that instead of this … or maybe that was wrong?
Alone you fight and hope, one day, he’ll grow up proud and strong.
You pray he’ll live to bring great joy to someone else’s home.
You know it’s all just up to you; you’ll fight this fight alone.

Formula, bottles, heating pads, you’ve got to get this right,
Two-hour feedings for this tiny guy, throughout the day and night.
Within your heart you dread that you will surely lose this fight,
To save this little baby, but God willing … you just MIGHT.

Day one, he’s in there fighting; you say a silent prayer.
Day two & three, he’s doing well, with lots of love and care.
Day four & five … he’s still alive; your hopes soar to the heavens.
Day six, he slips away again, dies in your hands, day seven.

You take this tiny angel, and bury him alone.
With aching heart and burning tears, and an exhausted groan,
You ask yourself, “Why do this? … Why suffer through this pain?”
Yet watch the joy your puppies bring, and everything’s explained.

So, when you think of breeders and label them with “Greed,”
Think of all that they endure to fill another’s need.
For when you buy your puppy, with your precious dollars part,
You only pay with money … while they pay with all their heart.

— Author Unknown

(Reprinted from The Labrador Retriever Quarterly News. Please let me know if you are the author or know who wrote it. We’d like to give credit, where credit is due.)

Cat and Axle (Justamere Catalyst RA CGC CC and CH Skyfire’s Oughta Be Haulin’ RN CGC WC) announce the birth of quadruplets!

Two boys and two girls – all blacks – joined the Justamere Ranch Labrador Retriever family. Bloodlines include:

  • GMHR Am/Mex/Int’l CH Cook’s Midnight Bandit MH
  • FC-AFC-CFC-CAFC DB’s Cracker of Clubmead
  • 2x NAFC-FC-2xCNAFC Ebonstar Lean Mac
  • Am/Can CH Skyfire’s Oughta Be A Law CD JH WC
  • BISS Am/Can CH Nipntuck Arncha Bold CD JH WC
  • CH Tabatha’s Drifter at Dickendall JH
  • CH Naiken Indian Temple MH
  • CH Guidelines Master Card

Stay tuned for more information!

© 2018 Justamere Ranch All rights reserved.
Do not copy photos and content without written permission.

Order Dynamite Specialty Products Watch Justamere Ranch videos on YouTube Connect with Justamere Ranch on Facebook